CLIMATE CHANGE

[ National Climate Scenarios | Perspective | International | Regional | Malaysian | Projects ]

Introduction


Climate Change, or Global Warming, is one of the most serious environmental threats of the 21st century. It is the only global environmental problem that receives the attention of heads of states and governments, and has been on the agenda for nearly all the G8 meetings in recent years.


As a first global political response to the threat of climate change, the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 agreed upon the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Malaysia is a Party to the UNFCCC and has ratified the Kyoto Protocol.


As a developing country, Malaysia has no quantitative commitments under the Kyoto Protocol at present. However, together with all other countries, Malaysia is already committed under the UNFCCC to, inter alia, “formulate, implement, publish and regularly update national and, where appropriate, regional programmes containing measures to mitigate climate change by addressing anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of all greenhouse gases…”.


During the December 2009 COP15 at Copenhagen, YAB Prime Minister of Malaysia announced that “Malaysia is adopting an indicator of a voluntary reduction of up to 40 percent in terms of emissions intensity of GDP (gross domestic product) by the year 2020 compared to 2005 levels”.

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National Climate Scenarios

Climate Scenarios for Malaysia based on Third Assessment Report (TAR) of the IPCC

Year 2025 2050 2100
Carbon Dioxide Concentration 405 – 460 ppm 445 – 460 ppm 540 – 970 ppm
Mean Temperature Rise 0.2 – 0.4 °C 0.3 – 1.0 °C 0.6 – 2.3 °C
Mean Precipitation Change - 5 % to + 5 % - 5 % to + 5 % - 5 % to + 5 %
Mean Sea-Level Rise 3 – 14 cm 5 – 32 cm 9 – 88 cm

(Source: Chan K.W., 2002; IPCC, 2001)

Projected Socio-Economic Impacts to Malaysia resulting from Sea Level Rise

Type of Impact Socio-economic Impacts based on the High Rate of Sea Level Rise (0.9cm/yr)
Loss of agricultural production from eroded/inundated lands RM 46 million for Western Johor Agricultural Development Project area. The West Johor Project area accounts for about 25% of the national drainage areas
Displacement and relocation of flood victims with associated disruption of business / economic activities resulting from increased flooding Long-term annual flood damage estimated at about RM88 million for Peninsular Malaysia and RM12 million for Sabah / Sarawak based on 1980 price level. If the flood frequency is doubled, the annual flood damage will increase by 1.67 times

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PERSPECTIVE

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International


International Bodies Addressing Climate Change.

United Nations Framework Convention On Climate Change (UNFCCC)


The 1990 Second World Climate Conference called for a framework treaty on climate change. The Conference supported a number of principles to be included in the Climate Change Convention. These include climate change as a common concern of humankind, the importance of equity, the common but differentiated responsibilities of countries at different levels of development, sustainable development and the precautionary principle.


The Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for a Framework Convention on Climate Change met for five sessions between February 1991 and May 1992 and finalized the Convention in 15 months.


The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change was signed by 154 states in1992 and it entered into force on 21 March 1994. Presently, the Conference of Parties (COP) is the Conventions ultimate authority.


Since 1995, the COP had been held once a year for 7 times. The Convention seeks to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases at safe levels. It commits developed countries to take measures aimed at returning their emissions to 1990 levels by year 2000. It also requires all countries to limit their emissions, gather relevant information, develop strategies for adapting to climate change and cooperate on research and sharing of environmentally friendly technologies.

Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change (IPCC)


IPCC is an independent scientist-technical body to assess available scientific, technical and socio-economic relevant information for understanding of the risks of human induced climate change. This group of scientists was jointly established by WMO together UNEP in 1988.


IPCC has produced a series of comprehensive Assessment Reports on the state of understanding of the causes of climate change, its potential impacts and options for response strategies. The IPCC First and Second Assessment reports were completed in 1990 and 1995. The Second Assessment concluded that the balance of evidence suggests that there has been a discernible human influence on the global climate.


IPCC has also prepared a list of technical papers, special reports, methodologies and guidelines which is used by policymakers, scientists and other experts. The Third Assessment report was produced in 2001.


The IPCC provides scientific and technical advice to the Conference of Parties to the UNFCCC and its bodies. The usefulness of IPCC lies in its ability to provide honest, independent and credible assessments of complex scientific, technical and economic issues.

Climate Action Network International(CAN)


CAN is a global network of over 320 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in 81 countries working to get action on limiting human-induced climate change. CAN members exchange information on climate change issues and pool expert knowledge from around the globe to develop initiatives to combat climate change at the international, regional, national and local levels.


CAN has seven regional coordinating offices which co-ordinate these efforts in Africa, Central and Eastern Europe, Europe, Latin America, North America, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. In addition there are national contact points in Australia, France, Canada, Japan, Russia and United Kingdom. Diverse environmental organizations from around the globe, ranging from large international groups such as World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth, to small local groups such as Terre Vivante in Mauritania, and the Albanian Ecological Club, work collaboratively within CAN.

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Regional

Climate Action Network – Southeast Asia (CANSEA)


Background and history


The CANSEA was established in January 1992 but formerly the idea of forming the regional network was raised when WAHLI of Indonesia, EPSM of Malaysia and Green Forum – Haribon Foundation of the Philippines were invited as observers to the Second INS Session in June 1991 in Geneva. It was felt that this form of partnership was needed to address the socio-political issues associated with the climate change debate and to exchange information, strengthen communication and coordinate activities at the regional level. This initiative further strengthened the regions link up with Climate Action Network (CAN) in Africa, South Asia, United States, Europe, Latin America, Eastern Europe, United Kingdom and the Pacific.


In August 1993, the Steering Committee in consultation with its partner NGOs at the national level, decided to rotate the Regional Secretariat every two years among member countries. In 1997, during the Steering Committee meeting in Malaysia, it was decided to do away with the Partners Assembly (because of the difficulty of raising funds for this meeting) and increasing the Steering Committee membership to 3 per country.


CANSEA is one of the eight regional networks of the Climate Action Network, an NGO established in 1989 in the run-up to the Second World Climate Conference of 1990. United by their common concern for the global climate, CAN members act in a number of different ways and roles in the climate process. CANSEA, like some CAN colleagues, are engaged in active lobby work with government representatives. CETDEM in the person of Gurmit Singh has very good influence with the Malaysian government especially with Mr. Chow Kok Kee, who is a key figure in the CoP/UNFCCC. Pelangi and Walhi have strong connections with the Indonesian government. They have at one time or the other been in the Indonesian delegation to the UN climate conferences (CoP) serving as advisers or in other capacities. CANSEA has represented the Southeast Asian voice in both the inter-sessional SBI and SBSTA as well as the regular CoP meetings of UNFCCC since CAN came into being.


Purpose


The CANSEA regional network is designed to create synergy in the matter of doing advocacy work at the local and national levels with our respective governments and internationally to join forces with the rest of CAN bringing along the sentiments and concerns of the developing countries, particularly the Southeast Asian perspective, to the lobbying/negotiating arena (the UN Climate Conference of Parties with all its subsidiary bodies meetings [SBSTA, SBI])


Objectives

  1. To strengthen the ability of national groups to address climate change issues through communication, training and information campaigns.
  2. To sustain regional and national efforts by exchanging and providing information
  3. To expand the network to include other NGOs from Southeast Asia


By-Law


Climate Action Network Southeast Asia is presently composed of 3 countries of Southeast Asia namely: Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Each country is represented on the Steering Committee by 3 persons namely the National Coordinator and 2 Steering Committee Members chosen from among the member organizations of each country member of CANSEA. The Regional Coordinator is rotated every two years around the member countries and is chosen by the Steering Committee of the host country. The Steering Committee should meet twice a year at least.


Membership to the National CANSEA should abide by the following criteria:

  1. A would-be member must be recommended by preferably at least 2 bonafide members in good standing.
  2. Only organizations and not individuals are allowed membership.
  3. The candidate member must be independent from government and business sectors.
  4. The candidate member must have climate change issues as its major concern.


The application should be cleared by the Regional Coordinator before final approval.


Organizational Structure of CANSEA


Steering Committee

  • 3 members per country
  • Facilitator of National Climate Change Group
  • National Climate Change Groups formed to make sure all partners involved in decision making


Regional Secretariat

  • Host country
  • Rotate every two years to member countries to manage the secretariat
  • 1992-1993 – Indonesia
    1994-1995 – Philippines
    1996-1997 – Malaysia
    1998-1999 – Indonesia
    2000-2001 – Philippines
    2002-2003 – Malaysia
    2004-2008 – Philippines
    2009-2010 – Indonesia
    2010-2012 – Malaysia
    2012-           – Thailand


CANSEAs profile


CANSEA is presently composed of 3 countries in Southeast Asia namely Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. With 19 member organizations and still expanding, it hopes to include Thailand with 2 or 3 organizations more.


Membership and staffing information


Number of Members:
19 member-organizations from Indonesia, Philippines, and Malaysia


Indonesia: Indonesian Climate Action Network (ICAN)
1. Lembaga Alam Tropika Indonesia (LATIN)
2. National Development Fund (NdeF)
3. Pelangi
4. Pesticide Action Network (PAN Indonesia)
5. Wahana Lingkungan Hidup Indonesia (WALHI)
6. Yayasan Bina Sains Hayati indonesia (YABSHI)
7. Yayasan Geni Nastiti (Geni)
8. Yayasan Lembaga Kosumen Indonesia (YLKI)


Malaysia: Malaysian Climate Change Group (MCCG)
1. Centre for Environment, Technology and Development, Malaysia (CETDEM)
2. Persatuan Pencinta Alam Malaysia (MNS)
3. Persatuan Perlindungan Alam Sekitar, Malaysia (EPSM)
4. WWF Malaysia
5. Global Environment Centre (GEC)


Philippines: Philippine Network on Climate Change (PNCC)
1. Green Forum Philippines (GFP)
2. Haribon Foundation
3. Legal Rights and Natural Resources Center-Kasama sa Kalikasan (LRC-KSK)
4. Lingkod Tao Kalikasan (LTK) 5. Miriam PEACE
6. Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement (PRRM)
7. Soljuspax/Sol Justitiae Et Pax


Membership Fees: None


Number of Full Time Staff: Regional Coordinator, National Coordinators of each member country, Steering committee members (3 from each country)


Number of part time Staff: Secretary/Administrative Assistant


Funding


In the early years, funding from external sources allowed for the costs of running the Secretariat, publishing a newsletter SEANEWS, and participation in international meetings to be covered. But since 1998, little funding has been forthcoming and only limited participation in international meetings has been possible.

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Malaysian Climate Change Group (MCCG)


The Malaysian Climate Change Group (MCCG), comprising non-governmental organizations, was launched in December 16, 1992 in Kuala Lumpur at the end of the CANSEA Research and Monitoring Workshop. The founding members are:
- Malaysian Nature Society (MNS)
- Environmental Protection Society, Malaysia (EPSM)
- Centre for Environment, Technology and Development, Malaysia (CETDEM)


The secretariat was hosted by EPSM until 1994. CETDEM took over the role with Gurmit Singh as the MCCG coordinator.
Perak Consumers Association (PCA) joined MCCG in Aug 2002.


In 2002, the MCCG launched a new three-year public awareness project, Mobilizing Malaysians on Climate Change (MMCC). CETDEM, as the then coordinating secretariat for the MCCG, administered the project, with funding from DANCED. The project was successfully completed in May 2005.


MNS hosted the Secretariat from Jan. 2005 till 2009. EPSM was host from 2009 till 2011. CETDEM took over the hosting of the Secretariat in 2011 with Anthony Tan as the MCCG Coordinator.


MCCG remains the only non-governmental body in Malaysia that actively addresses climate change issues. It has developed a good profile internationally; locally, member organizations have good working relationships with government agencies. We have developed a wealth of knowledge of how climate change issues and impacts relate to the broad socio-economic-political terrain in Malaysia, and what needs to be done by all sectors of Malaysian society to address the long-term problems of climate change.


Members recognize that one of the MCCGs strengths is its informality and flexibility but accept that we cannot be complacent: there is still much work to do! Public awareness of climate issues is alarmingly low, and scientific understanding of mitigation and adaptation strategies still developing.


This network of people and resources have been working both behind the scenes and on the front-lines and are active in attending international conferences, organising public talks and fora, creating informative materials, to try to mobilise as many sectors of Malaysian society as possible to address the problems of climate, both local and global.

Objectives


1) Share and disseminate information on climate change issues.
2) Coordinate activities at the national level.
3) Play an active role in CANSEA and CAN and international events concerning climate change.
4) Lobby the Malaysian government to be proactive on climate change issues.


Malaysia signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on June 9, 1993 and ratified it on July 17, 1994. As a signatory to the Convention, Malaysia is committed under the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities to carry out her obligations as provided in the Convention.

Statements


MCCG Position Paper No. : 1/ 02


Priorities in Technology Transfer


For reducing GHG emissions


INTRODUCTION


There has been much talk since 1992, both in the context of UNFCCC as well as UNCED, about technology transfer BUT very little action. With almost a decade wasted, NGOs & countries [especially from the South] need to develop some directions for getting urgent action taken in this area. This short paper tries to set out some broad outlines as to what the priorities should be.


THE PRIORITIES


Firstly, let us get the concepts right. Technology is never transferred but shared by the owner with others through licensing or some other means. And it consists of both the hardware and software. Fully sharing would mean that the personnel of the recipient are able to adapt or modify the technology. This capacity building must be a cornerstone of measuring the success of any TS [technology sharing].


Secondly, sharing is not exclusively a North-South or developed-developing country one-way path but is omni directional. No nation has the exclusive domain over critical technologies although some have more than others.


Thirdly, patenting or private property rights must not be allowed to obstruct the resolution of global environmental problems like climate change by placing insurmountable barriers to TS.


Fourthly, technologies need to be carefully screened and evaluated by all parties to any sharing arrangement so that such sharing actually reduces GHG emissions or provides positive environmental benefits.


Fifthly, the intended beneficiaries of any TS must fully participate in discussions leading up to the TS actually taking place so that they have an ownership stake in the final technology when it arrives.


Sixthly, the technology must blend into the cultural, social, religious and value systems of the host community.


Seventhly, technologies must not be evaluated on a stand-alone basis but as a mixture that will solve the needs of, say an energy-starved rural community.


OPTIONS


Using the above priorities, the following technologies can be considered as useful options for abating global warming:

1. Windmills
2. PVs
3. Solar heaters, driers & cookers
4. Micro-hydro turbines
5. Energy conservation, especially on systems basis
6. Biogas & biomass with full combustion
7. Efficient, clean & affordable public transport system
8. CNG, fuel cells and other “low” carbon fuels
9. Engines & motors with least losses [energy wastage]
10. Facilities for safer use of non-motorised transport e.g. bicycles
11. Organic agriculture.
12. Pollution prevention & resource reduction processes
13. Permanent carbon fixation.
14. Improved passive design changes to built-structures like housing & offices.


ACTION


Malaysia, which has been active in the technology transfer discussions within the UNFCCC, should use the above priorities and options to help get the last SBSTA and COP decisions on technology transfer translated into concrete action in the shortest possible time. If necessary, it should get other ASEAN nations to establish a regional TT evaluation centre so that the technologies meet our priorities and needs.


It should also ensure that the expert group on technology transfer [as decided upon by COP7] produces a useful report at the forthcoming COP8, where the secretariat is also required to show that an information clearing house on the subject is operational. MCCG, on its part, will actively push for these priorities and action within CAN and the larger NGO community.


-Gurmit Singh, MCCG Coordinator

Activities and Achievements


National


1) MMCC Project 2002-2004. Click here for further information on the project to mobilize Malaysians to address climate change. As part of MMCC activities, members have undertaken exercises to plan strategies for strengthening the networks capacity to address climate change, both in Malaysia and internationally, and hopes to expand the membership base.


2) Actively provide inputs to Malaysian government positions


3) Lobbying through the media & direct representation against activities that lead to greater GHG emissions

4) Promoting greater public awareness


Regional


1) CANSEA membership
2) Attempts to influence ASEAN action on the issues


International


1) Participation in UNFCCC meetings as well as those of CAN.
2) Strengthening the lobbying positions of CANSEA

Projects

[ Climate Change Seminars | CACCET | MMCC ]

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Climate Change Seminars – CETDEM’s Signature Event

The World Environment Day (WED) celebration began in 1972. An event celebrated on 5 June every year, WED has grown into the biggest and most widely celebrated global day for positive environmental action as it stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and encourages political attention and action. Through the observance of World Environment Day, people have been able to personalize environmental issues and enabled everyone to realize not only their responsibility, but also their power to become agents for change in support of sustainable and equitable development.

CETDEM began the series of annual 1-day Climate Change Seminars in 2007 as a platform to share and disseminate the latest information related to Climate Change. The 2007 Seminar looked into the workings of the Clean Development Mechanism. The following 3 years were focused on the UNFCCC International Negotiations. There was a break in 2011. The 2012 & 2013 Seminars moved away from the negotiations and re-focused on the practical implementation of Mitigation and Adaptation efforts. In 2014 we moved to a 1/2 day format which is more attractive and manageable.

The annual Climate Change Seminar is recognised as one of CETDEM “Signature Event”. Participants are charged a reasonable fee and sponsorship is welcomed. Any ‘profit’ from the Seminar is channelled to the General Fund for operating expenses.

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2015 – Friday 22 May
Climate Change & Water Dialogue 2015


Organised by CETDEM
with financial support from
Selangor State Government, DiGi Telecommunications and YTL Bhd
endorsed by
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia, MyCWP and MCCG,
held at
Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor


Programme


Paper 1: The Reality of Climate Change
- Engr Gurmit Singh, CETDEM Chairman
Paper 2: Are Climate Change Negotiations Tackling Water Issues Adequately?
- Dr Gary William Theseira, Ministry of NRE
Under-secretary, Environmental Management and Climate Change (PASPI)
Paper 3: Coping with Greater Frequency and Severity of Weather Extremes (especially Flooding)
- Prof. Dr Fredolin T. Tangang, IPCC WG1 Vice-Chair, Fellow Academy of Sciences Malaysia
Paper 4: Tackling Water Stresses
- Datuk Ir. Mohd Adnan Mohd Nor, Malaysian Water Partnership vice-Chair, Director of RPM Engineers
Paper 5: Water and Industry
- Dato’ Ir. Hanapi bin Mohamad Noor, Chairman of Water Resources Technical Division, Institution of Engineers Malaysia


Panel Discussion: Climate Change & Water
Panelist:
- Engr Gurmit Singh
- Prof. Dr Fredolin T. Tangang,
- Datuk Ir. Mohd Adnan Mohd Nor,
- Dato’ Ir. Hanapi bin Mohamad Noor
Moderator: Datuk Dr. Abdul Rahim bin Haji Nik, Deputy Secretary General (Environment) of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment


Overview


Here are some self explanatory cartoons. Enjoy!


Climate Change & Water – too much, too little … TO LATE ??

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2014 – Friday 22 September
Climate Change Water Nexus – What is Malaysia doing about it?


Organised by CETDEM
endorsed by
MCCG,
held at
Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor

Programme


Paper 1: Water-Climate Change Nexus: JPS Perspective
- YBhg Dato’ Dr Hj Hanapi bin Mohamad Noor, Pengarah Bahagian Pengurusan Lembangan Sungai, Jabatan Pengairan dan Saliran
Paper 2: What can be done to cut down the per capita water consumption?
- Dr K. Kalithasan, River Care Coordinator, Global Environment Centre
Paper 3: Loss of catchment areas
- Mr Balu Perumal, Head of Conservation, Malaysian Nature Society
Paper 4: Water in Malaysia: The Holistic Sustainable Path
- Engr Gurmit Singh, Chairman, CETDEM


Panel Discussion: Climate Change & Water
Panelist:
- YBhg Dato’ Dr Hj Hanapi bin Mohamad Noor
- Dr K. Kalithasan
- Datuk Ir. Mohd Adnan Mohd Nor,
- Mr Balu Perumal
- Engr Gurmit Singh
Moderator: Dato’ Dr Yap Kok-Seng, the former Director-General of the Malaysian Meteorological Department (MMD) (2005 – 2012)


Overview


‘Climate Change Water Nexus: What is Malaysia doing about it?’ is an urgent call to review and act on the issue of water management and Climate Change, matters of great importance that have long term repercussions for indivudials and organisations, as well as both the private and public sectors.

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2013 – Wednesday 5 June
Adaptation: Do or Fry?

Organised by CETDEM
sponsored by
Core Competencies Sdn Bhd, Shell Malaysia, DiGi Telecommunicaitons Sdn Bhd and FMM-MIMG,
endorsed by
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia and MCCG,
held at
AnCasa Hotel and Spa Kuala Lumpur


Programme


Keynote Address: Vulnerability & Risk
- Dato’ Dr Yap Kok-Seng, CETDEM (former DG of Met Dept)
Paper 1: Adaptation in the International Negotiations
- Ms Koh Fui Pin, Research Officer, SEADPRI-UKM
Paper 2: Adaptation at the National Level
- Ir. Haji Mohd Fauzi bin Mohamad, NAHRIM
Case Study 1: Integrated Coastal Management
- Tuan Haji Md Khairi bin Selamat, LUAS Director
Case Study 2: Energy Efficiency in Buildings
- Faizul Bin Haji Ideris, Msian Insulation Manufacturers Group (FMM MIMG)


Panel Discussion: The Cost of Doing Nothing
Panelist:
- Dato’ Dr Yap Kok-Seng
- Ir. Haji Mohd Fauzi bin Mohamad
- Tuan Haji Md Khairi bin Selamat
- Mr Faizul bin Haji Ideris
Moderator: Mr Gurmit Singh


Overview


In this seminar, CETDEM highlighted the relevant efforts of Government, Private Sector and NGOs to make adaptation a reality in Malaysia. NAHRIM showed us possible scenarios related to percipitation changes. LUAS has set the example of integrated coastal management for other state coastal agencies to emulate. FMM MIMG is promoting insulation as a adaptation response to arrest the indoor effects the steady increase in outdoor temperature. I admit that the examples presented are far from perfect. In fact, they are puny compared to the global challenge we face. However, we must recognise that ‘every journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step’.

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2012 – Tuesday 5 June
Adaptation or Mitigation: Do We have a Choice?


Organised by CETDEM
with financial support from
European Delegation to Malaysia and Selangor State Government,
endorsed by
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia and MCCG,
held at
Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor

Programme


Welcome Speech by HE Mr. Vincent Piket, Ambassador & Head of the EU Delegation to Malaysia
Official Opening by YB Dato’ Sri Douglas Uggah Embas, Minister of Natural Resources & Environment


Paper 1: UK policy on Adaptation
- Mr Muru Loganathan, British High Commission
Paper 2: Adaptation & Mitigation – Finding a Balance
- Dr Gary W. Theseira, Deputy Undersecretary, Env. Management and Climate Change Div., NRE
Paper 3: Transforming Petaling Jaya into a Low Carbon City
- Mr Lee Lih Shyan, Deputy Director & Head of OSC Unit, MBPJ
Paper 4: DiGi’s contribution towards Adaptation and Mitigation in Malaysia.
- Ms Sumitra Nair, Head of Business Environment, DiGi Telecommunications
Paper 5: Low Carbon Sustainable Development Options for Malaysia
- Mr Gurmit Singh, CETDEM Chairman

Panel Discussion: Challenges faced in Adaptation & Mitigation
Panelist:
- Datuk Mohd Tap Salleh, President, Malaysian Institiute of Integrity
- Mr Muru Loganathan
- Dr Gary W. Theseira
- Mr Lee Lih Shyan
- Ms Sumitra Nair
Moderator: Mr Gurmit Singh


Overview


Adaptation is derived from the root word Adapt.
Pronunciation: /əˈdapt/
To make (something) suitable for a new use or purpose; modify.


Mitigation is derived from the root word Mitigate.
Pronunciation: /ˈmɪtɪgeɪt/
To make (something bad) less severe, serious, or painful;
lessen the gravity of (an offence or mistake):


I begin with references to the Oxford Dictionary simply to ensure that we understand the root meaning of these two words – Adapation and Mitigation. These two words point us to a conclusion which makes many people uncomfortable – like it or not, we have to make a Change in the way we live.


Adaptation compels us to make changes vis-a-vis problems which may or may not be caused by ourselves, whereas Mitigation gives the sense of seeking a way to reduce the burden of guilt, admitting that we have committed a grave offence or mistake. In this case, our offence is against the planet Earth (and ourselves), and it can be stated as the ‘unprecedented release of Greenhouse Gas into the atmosphere caused by human activities’.


The sexy phrase for this century is ‘Going Green’.


Most actions of Adaptation and Mitigation are much more of an attempt at ‘Becoming Light Brown’ than a matter of ‘Going Green’.


Which bring us back to our basic question: Adaptation or Mitigation – Do we have a choice?


It is my humble opinion that our current generation – whose wasteful use of resources is promoted as a worldwide culture and lifestyle – will be found guilty by future generations of humankind on this planet, guilty of gross and criminal irresponsibility, if we decide to do nothing or move too slowly to decouple ourselves from the highly carbon-reliant economy that we have become accustomed and addicted to.


Even as negotiatiors continue to argue at COPs, MOPs and other international conferences over baseline years, percentages, finance and technology; even as the world marks Rio + 20 this month – Global Warming continues to impact this planet, human lives and the numerous ecological systems in ways that can only be termed as frightening.


We must choose, either to adapt or mitigate or do both. Inaction, is most clearly, not an option.

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2011 – No Climate Change Event was held

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2010 – Monday 7th June
Can Cancun redeem Copenhagen?

Organised by CETDEM
endorsed by
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia,
co-funded by
the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands,
held at
Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor


Programme


Diplomatic Dialogue: What are the Expectations for CANCUN?
- HE Mr Horge Alberto Lozoya, Ambassador of Mexico to Malaysia
- HE Mr Vincent Piket, Ambassador, Head of Delegation of European Union to Malaysia
Chaired by Dr Gary William Theseira, Deputy Undersecretary, Environmental Management & Climate Change, NRE


Paper 1: How will Malaysia achieve its voluntary emission reduction target?
- Dr Rahim Nik, FRIM/NRE
Paper 2: Do NGOs expect any achievements at Cancun?
- Mr Chironjit Das, Malaysian Youth Climate Justice Network


Official Opening by YB Datuk Douglas Uggah Embas, Minister of Natural Resources & Environment


Paper 3:From Hopenhagen to Floppenhagen
- Mr Gurmit Singh, CETDEM Chairman
Paper 4: How can the Malaysian Private Sector contribute toward mitigating GHG emissions in Malaysia?
- Mr Tay Kay Luan, BCSDM President


Panel Discussion: The Journey to Cancun
Panelist:
- Dr Gary William Theseisa
- Mr Chironjit Das
- Mr Tay Kay Luan
Moderator: Anthony Tan

Overview

Hopenhage or Floppenhagen?
This is the million dollar question!

The great expectations which were unfulfilled in Copenhagen last year has left many negotiators and observers from governments and NGOs wondering, “Where do we go from here?”. The Copenhagen Accord was heralded as a significant outcome by the United States of America, but was merely noted at Copenhagen. The “Talk Shop” seems to have continued for yet another year. It meant lots of travelling for negotiators, but nothing much to show for from the tons of carbon emissions from thousands of air-miles to attend numerous conferences. Now, the world looks to sunny Mexico (COP 16) for some warmth and clear vision, after the cold and dreary meetings in Poznan (COP 14) and Copenhagen (COP 15).


CETDEM decided to pose this question – Can Cancun redeem Copenhagen? – to delve into the expectations of those concerned with the progress of the all too often slow and drawn-out process which is call the Climate Change negotiations.


The Bali Mandate which calls for an agreement to the post-2012 commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol was to be concluded at Copenhagen COP15 in 2009. This, sadly, was not achieved.


As part of this seminar, a Diplomatic Dialogue was arranged to provide a unique opportunity for the Heads of Mission representing Annex-I and as well as developing countries to present to the participants an international perspective of Climate Change negotiations. We are very glad to have had the participation of the Mexicana and EUEmbassies in the Dialogue. We had a very good mix of Government & private sector policy makers, project proponents, academics, researchers, NGOs and even political parties concerned with the environment and climate change.


Appreciation


CETDEM wishes to thank the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, especially to His Excellency the Ambassador Bekkers, and the Deputy Head of Mission, Mr Jan Soer for their support, in co-funding this seminar, and continuing their collaboration with CETDEM in a Climate Change related seminar for the 4th year running.


We also wish to record our gratitude to YB Dato Sri Douglas Uggah Embas, Minister of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia for his Ministry’s endorsement of our seminar, not forgetting the speakers/panelists, supporting staff of CETDEM. We take this opportunity to thank all seminar participants who gave their full attention throughout the proceedings.

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2009 – Monday 15 June
COP15 Copenhagen: Great Expectations?


Jointly organised by CETDEM and Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
with support from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia,
held at Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor


Programme


Diplomatic Dialogue: Climate Change – Concerns, Perspectives & Expectations
- Mr Vincent Piket, Ambassador of EU Delegation
- Mr Bo Mønsted, Charge de Affairs of the Royal Danish Embassy
Moderated by Dr Lian Kok Fei, Undersecretary, CEMD NRE


Paper 1: What should be Malaysia’s role in Copenhagen COP15?
- Mr Chow Kok Kee, STREC
Paper 2: Perspective of Forest related debates expected in Copenhagen COP15?
- Ms Kanitha Krishnasamy, MNS


Speech and Official Opening YB Datuk Douglas Uggah Embas, Minister of Natural Resources & Environment


Paper 3: The Economics of Climate Change in Southeast Asia: A Regional Review
- Mr Suphachol Suphachalasai, Economist, ADB
Paper 4: What did Bonn II achieve?
- Mr Gurmit Singh, CETDEM Chairman


Panel Discussion: Are the Copenhagen expectations realistic?
Panelist:
- Mr Chow Kok Kee, STREC
- Ms Melissa Chin, WWF-Malaysia
- Mr Gurmit Singh, CETDEM
Moderator: Anthony Tan, CETDEM


Overview


Another year of Climate Change negotiations has passed since the 2008 Climate Change Conference where we discussed the post-Bali scenario. The world had held its breath as Poznan COP14 approached at the end of 2008. But as with most other COPs, Poznan proved to be another “Talk Shop” and nothing much in terms of substance was achieved, other than placing Copenhagen COP15 as THE Conference to end all conferences.


With such a heavy burden placed on this year’s COP, CETDEM and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands found that it was not only logical but also very appropriate that we discuss the GREAT EXPECTATIONS being carried into Copenhagen.


The Climate has changed. In 2007, in the run-up to Bali, a new Climate-friendly Australian Government took shape. In 2009, it is expected that an Environmentally knowledgable political party will form the next Government in Japan.


The Bali Mandate which calls for an agreement to the post-2012 commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol is to be concluded at Copenhagen COP15 in 2009. Can this be achieved?


As part of this seminar, a Diplomatic Dialogue was arranged to provide a unique opportunity for the Heads of Mission from various ASEAN countries to present to the participants the major threats their countries face, the actions they have taken as well as the expectations they have for the Copenhagen meetings. Due to reasons beyond our control, this did not materialise. However, we are more than happy with the participation of the EU and Danish Embassies in the Dialogue. We had a very good mix of Government & private sector policy makers, project proponents, academics, researchers, NGOs and even political parties concerned with the environment and climate change.


Appreciation


CETDEM wishes to thank the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, especially to His Excellency the Ambassador, Mr Lody Embrechts and the Deputy Head of Mission, Mr Jan Soer for their support, in giving CETDEM the opportunity to jointly organise a Climate Change related seminar in collaboration with the Embassy for the 3rd year running.


We also wish to record our gratitude to YB Datuk Douglas Uggah Embas, Minister of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia for his Ministry’s endorsement of our seminar, not forgetting the speakers/panelists, supporting staff of CETDEM and the Embassy. We take this opportunity to thank all seminar participants who gave their full attention throughout the proceedings.


Lastly, and on a sad note, I wish to report the peaceful passing of one of our speakers, Mr Chow Kok Kee, on Sunday, 9th August 2009. Malaysia has lost a great son, and the world’s Climate Change community has lost its beloved Chairman Chow.

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2008 – Thursday 5 June
Between Bali and Poznan: Concrete Actions on Climate Change


Jointly organised by CETDEM and Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
with support from
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia,
to assess Climate Change pressing issues,
a midway review between Bali (2007) and Poznan (2008) COPs,
held at
Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor


Programme


Diplomatic Dialogue: What is the international community doing post-Bali?
* Mr Luc Schilings, Deputy Head of Mission,
representing HE Lody Embrechts, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
* HE T. Jasudasen, High Commissioner of Singapore
* Mr Andrew Ford, Councillor of Political & Economic Section,
representing HE Penny Williams, High Commissioner of Australia.
* HE Boyd McCleary, High Commissioner of Britain
* HE Ashok K. Kantha, High Commissioner of India
Moderator: YBhg Dto’ Suboh b. Mohd Yassin, Secretary General of NRE


Paper 1: Malaysian Government actions post-Bali
-Dr Yap Kok Seng, Director General, Met Dept, Ministry of Science, Tech & Innovation
Paper 2: Tangible local and international happenings after Bali
-Mr Gurmit Singh, Chairman, CETDEM
Paper 3: CDM & Timber
- En Samsudin b Musa, Senior Research Officer, Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Paper 4: How carbon neutral is Bio-fuel from Palm Oil?
- Mr Chee, representing Mr Faizal Parish, GEC Exec Dir


Panel Discussion: The pressing issues for Poznan COP14
Panelist:
- Mr Chow Kok Kee, STREC
- Ms Ivy Wong Abdullah, WWF-Malaysia
- Pn Badriyah , Ministry of Energy, Water & Communication
- Mr Anthony Tan, CETDEM
Moderator: Gurmit Singh


Overview


Year 2007 saw Climate Change emerge as one of the most critical issues the international community has had to deal with in this century. Climate Change affects everyone, everywhere, because no country on Earth is immune to the effects of Climate Change. Climate Change will have a lasting impact, not only on how countries interact with each other, but also how businesses will be conducted and will affect the very way in which we live.


From the Academy Awards to the Nobel Peace Prize, Climate Change has managed to capture the attention of a world wide audience. What used to be a debate confined to scientists, environmentalists and specialized Government Agencies has slowly but surely crept into the mainstream discussion.


The run-up to Bali COP13 was filled with great anticipation. The outcome of the 2 week conference was touted as a milestone in Climate Change negotiations. Australia added their name to the Kyoto Protocol, thus leaving the US as the only Annex-I country that has not yet signed.


The Bali Mandate calls for an agreement to the post-2012 commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol (with continued discussions through Poznan COP14, 2008) to be concluded at Copenhagen COP15 in 2009.


As part of this seminar, a Diplomatic Dialogue was arranged to provide a unique opportunity for the Heads of Mission from various countries to present to the participants the major threats their countries face, the actions they have taken as well as the expectations they have for the Poznan and Copenhagen meetings. The other topics were chosen to give participants a better understanding of what are the major issues that you can expect at Poznan. We had a very good mix of Government & private sector policy makers, project proponents, academics, researchers, NGOs and even political parties concerned with the environment and climate change.


Appreciation


CETDEM wishes to thank the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, especially to His Excellency the Ambassador, Mr Lody Embrechts and the Deputy Head of Mission, Mr Luc Schilings for their support, in giving CETDEM the opportunity to jointly organise a Climate Change related seminar in collaboration with the Embassy for the 2nd year running.


We also wish to record our gratitude to YB Datuk Douglas Uggah Embas, Minister of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia for his Ministry’s endorsement of our seminar, not forgetting the speakers/panelists, supporting staff of CETDEM and the Embassy. And last but not in any way the least, we thank all seminar participants who gave their full attention throughout the proceedings.

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2007 – Tuesday 5th June
Are CDMs Working?


Jointly organized by CETDEM & Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
with support from
Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia
held at
Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya, Selangor


Programme


Opening Speech by His Excellency Mr Lody Embrechts, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands


Paper 1-1: How has CDM worked – Malaysia’s experience with CDM projects.
- Mr Chong Poon Chai, Principal Assistant Secretary, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia
Paper 1-2: Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) in Malaysia.
- Mr Azman Zainal Abidin, Deputy Director, Pusat Tenaga Malaysia
Paper 2: Annex 1 perceptions on the current CDM and the role of the CDM under a post-Kyoto regime: a buyers perspective.
- Mr Reginald Hernaus, Deputy Head, Clean Development Mechanism, Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment, Netherlands
Paper 3: CDM – Shifting the burden to Developing countries?
- Mr. Gurmit Singh, Chairman, CETDEM
Paper 4: Is CDM helping Dutch investors reduce emissions?
- Ms Veronique Bovee, Ecosecurities Malaysia Sdn Bhd
Paper 5: Challenges that CDM poses to Malaysian Entities.
- Mr Chow Kok Kee, former Director General of Malaysian Meteorological Department & Ex-member of CDM Executive Board


Panel Discussion: How can the CDM be improved?
Panelists:
- Mr Chong Poon Chai,
- Mr Chow Kok Kee
- Ms Veronique Bovee
- Mr Reginald Hernaus


Overview


UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol, IPCC, Annex I, Carbon Emissions Reduction and CDM – many have heard of these phrases and acronyms, but few actually understand what they mean. For some, this list of words is related to the fight against Global Warming, but for some, these are buzz words for the potentially lucrative global business of Carbon Trading.


“ARE CDMs WORKING?” is an attempt by CETDEM to move the focus from the “business” of CDM, to reviewing the benefits (or otherwise) that this mechanism has brought (or can bring) to all those involved in a CDM project.


All too often, CDM is viewed from a predominantly financial point of view. CETDEM has tried very hard to break this mold with this seminar, the first in what we hope to be a yearly Climate Change related event on World Environment Day which is celebrated on 5th June each year.


For those of us who attended the seminar, this report serves as a quick reference to what was shared by the speakers/panelists. For those who were not present at the seminar, you now have the opportunity to learn what was shared.


Appreciation


CETDEM wishes to thank the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, especially to His Excellency the Ambassador, Mr Lody Embrechts and the Deputy Head of Mission, Mr Luc Schilings for their support, in giving CETDEM the opportunity to jointly organise this seminar in collaboration with the Embassy.


We also wish to record our gratitude to Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Malaysia for endorsing our seminar, not forgetting the speakers/panelists, supporting staff of CETDEM and the Embassy. And last but not in any way the least, we thank all seminar participants who gave their full attention throughout the proceedings.

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Creating Awareness on issues related to Climate Change, Energy Usage and Transport in Kajang and Petaling Jaya (CACCET)


An 11-month Awareness and Capacity Building Project funded by Ministry of Natural Resources & Environment


CACCET Project

Background


CETDEM developed the CACCET project as a follow-up to the WCPJ Project. But iinstead of just talking about Energy Efficiency, there would be the added emphasis of linking Climate Change to Energy usage and Transport.
Two resource persons, a project coordinator and a field officer (both part time), would managed the Project.
The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (NRE) agreed to fund the Project. It is listed as one of the projects commissioned by NRE under the Ninth Malaysia Plan (RMK9).

Objectives


The objectives of CACCET:
a. develop an energy consumption profile; &
b. analise attitudes to use of public transport
for two large urban communities of Kajang and Petaling Jaya, both located in the state of Selangor.


Participation would be sought from 20 households each in Kajang and Petaling Jaya. These participating households would be instructed on how to become more efficient energy users. They would also be encouraged to increase usage of public transport as a local solution to address the issue of Climate Change.

Main Activities


The Official Launch was held on 26th May 2007 at Hotel Malaya KL.


A series of briefings were held in collaboration with the various Citizens Groups in Kajang and Petaling Jaya.


Briefing with DJROA participants


These briefings had a four fold purpose:
a. Better understanding of Climate Change and the linkage to Energy consumption and Transport;
b. How to do an Energy Audit;
c. The need for good and reliable public transport; and,
d. Invite participation in CACCET.

The Official Closing Ceremony was held on 26th January 2008 at Hotel Armada Petaling Jaya.


Project Leader speaking to guests


The Project Leader spoke on the challenges faced during the project. The Field Officer gave a presentation on the results of the Audit and Survey.


Project Leader giving souvenirs to participants


The Project Leader presented souvenirs to participants who had completed and submitted the Energy Audit and Transport Survey Forms during the course of the project.

    Results


Click to enlarge: Participants Information


10 households each from Kajang and Petaling Jaya completed the Energy Audit forms and Transport Survey.


Click to enlarge: Average Energy Consumption Breakdown


Click to enlarge: Average Electricity Consumption Breakdown


Based on the findings from CACCET and WCPJ, the GHG emissions from an urban household is just below 4,000 kg per Capita.

Click here to read more about CACCET Project

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Mobilising Malaysian on Climate Change (MMCC)

Background


MMCC Project 2002-2004. As part of MMCC activities, members have undertaken exercises to plan strategies for strengthening the networks capacity to address climate change, both in Malaysia and internationally, and hopes to expand the membership base.


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